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waltoj10
Pilgrim

Build Time Variables don't work via Environment on Windows Server 2012 R2

We have an InstallAnywhere 2015 project configured with several Build Time Variables. These build time variables are set in the environment using IA_BTV_VARIABLE_NAME. The project runs just fine on Windows 7, but the same project pulled directly from the source repository does not work on Windows Server 2012 R2.

When running on Windows Server 2012 R2, this statement is printed:
[buildinstaller] Could not read environmental variables from the system for build time variables.

This is very odd since an administrator account is being used. Also, the variables are visible via the Command Prompt, PowerShell, and even Ant. So it is a mystery why InstallAnywhere 2015 is unable to read them.
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3 Replies
waltoj10
Pilgrim

Re: Build Time Variables don't work via Environment on Windows Server 2012 R2

There happens to be a work around for this problem. Tell Windows to run the InstallAnywhere 2015 JRE in Windows 7 Compatibility mode. In a default install, the JRE is here: C:\Program Files (x86)\InstallAnywhere 2015\jre\bin\java.exe. This allows InstallAnywhere to use the environment for build time variables on Windows 8/Server 2012 and higher.
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xexukulu
Pilgrim

Working Fine This Side

Yea was doing the same with the Amazon server of win R2, and yea working pretty fine except few lags.

With Regards,
Xexukulu https://8ballpool.onl/
https://googlehangouts.ooo/
https://omegle.onl/
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michellas
Pilgrim

Build Time Variables don't work via Environment on Windows Server 2012 R2

If it is a local Server 2012 environment variable you seek, you can use PowerShell to create a new system or user environment variable make sure you run PowerShell as Administrator.

Machine variable:
[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable('Name','Value','Machine')
User variable:
[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable('Name','Value','User') movie streaming app

To check the current environment variables, use the following PowerShell command

Get-Childitem ENV:
Note: you will need to close PowerShell and open a new instance to see the newly created environment variable.
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