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How to obtain Flexera Agent Logs on Linux/Unix Systems

How to obtain Flexera Agent Logs on Linux/Unix Systems

There are 2 directories on these systems we need in Flexera Support, I shall go through the process on where each one is in this guide,

First, open up a terminal and go to the root directory-

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Then we need to Navigate to our first folder, /var/opt/managesoft/

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This folder contains all the operational settings for the Agent, we request you send us all the contents of this folder in an archive. [in particular both ‘etc’ and ‘log’]

 

Next, we need to navigate to our second folder, /opt/managesoft/

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This folder contains all the installation files for the Agent, we request you send us all the contents of this folder in an archive. [in particular ‘bin’]

 

If unsure on how to create an archive, please refer to the next section which goes over creation in the terminal

 

 

The tar command on Linux is often used to create .tar.gz or .tgz archive files, also called “tarballs.” This command has a large number of options, but you just need to remember a few letters to quickly create archives with tar. The tar command can extract the resulting archives, too.

The GNU tar command included with Linux distributions has integrated compression. It can create a .tar archive and then compress it with gzip or bzip2 compression in a single command. That’s why the resulting file is a .tar.gz file or .tar.bz2 file.

Compress an Entire Directory or a Single File

Use the following command to compress an entire directory or a single file on Linux. It’ll also compress every other directory inside a directory you specify–in other words, it works recursively.

tar -czvf name-of-archive.tar.gz /path/to/directory-or-file

Here’s what those switches actually mean:

  • -c: Create an archive.
  • -z: Compress the archive with gzip.
  • -v: Display progress in the terminal while creating the archive, also known as “verbose” mode. The v is always optional in these commands, but it’s helpful.
  • -f: Allows you to specify the filename of the archive.

Let’s say you have a directory named “stuff” in the current directory and you want to save it to a file named archive.tar.gz. You’d run the following command:

tar -czvf archive.tar.gz stuff

Or, let’s say there’s a directory at /usr/local/something on the current system and you want to compress it to a file named archive.tar.gz. You’d run the following command:

tar -czvf archive.tar.gz /usr/local/something

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Compress Multiple Directories or Files at Once

While tar is frequently used to compress a single directory, you could also use it to compress multiple directories, multiple individual files, or both. Just provide a list of files or directories instead of a single one. For example, let’s say you want to compress the /home/ubuntu/Downloads directory, the /usr/local/stuff directory, and the /home/ubuntu/Documents/notes.txt file. You’d just run the following command:

tar -czvf archive.tar.gz /home/ubuntu/Downloads /usr/local/stuff /home/ubuntu/Documents/notes.txt

Just list as many directories or files as you want to back up.

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Last update:
‎Jun 30, 2020 11:44 AM
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